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Kids online — parent views

Kids online — parent views and information needs

90% of parents say their child benefits from being online. These parents see the benefits as being:

  • School work 73% 
  • Finding information 63% 
  • Entertainment 50% 
  • Technology proficiency 47% 
  • Feeling closer to friends & family 30% 
  • Problem-solving skills 20% 
  • Creativity 18% 

60% of parents say their child is exposed to risks from being online. They see the risks as:

  • Accessing inappropriate content 60% 
  • Contact with strangers 50% 
  • Excessive use 42% 
  • Reduced fitness 36% 
  • Sharing personal information 35% 
  • Being bullied online 29% 
  • Feeling isolated 22% 
  • Negative self-image 20% 
  • Viruses, scams and fraud 6% 

55% of parents can see both the benefits and risks of their child being online

66% of parents are confident in their ability to protect their child online

38% of parents need information about online safety. The information they want:

  • Dealing with negative online incidents 71% 
  • Online stranger danger 50% 
  • Images going viral 37% 
  • Online fraud 34% 
  • Other parents’ experiences 28% 

29% of parents need information about appropriate internet usage for children. They want information about:

  • Managing what their child does online 52% 
  • Managing time online 49% 
  • Guidelines for online time 49% 
  • Age appropriate apps or websites 48%

27% of parents sought or received information about children's online safety in the 12 months to June 2016. These are the sources used:

  • School 63% 
  • Family/friends and other parents 36% 
  • Online search engines 36% 
  • Government organisations 25% 
  • My child 19% 
  • News media 19% 
  • Social media companies 16% 
  • Non-government organisations 15% 
  • Other organisations including libraries, religious groups, police 17% 

Source: Survey commissioned by the Office of the eSafety Commissioner, June 2016. Data covers actions taken by 2,360 parents in Australia with children aged 8 to 17 years in 12 months to June 2016
 

See also:

About the research (2016 survey): Digital participation

More recent research (2018 survey): Digital parenting