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Anna

Anna lives in a supported residential home. Her house manager has been filming Anna’s private activities and threatens to share the footage with others. Anna and her disability support worker talk about the help available to her.  

This personal story shows how women with intellectual or cognitive disability can experience technology-facilitated abuse. It covers available support pathways – to help disability specialists and frontline workers in the domestic and family violence sectors support clients to manage technology-facilitated abuse.

This story is inspired by real events and the characters are played by actors.

eSafety has developed dedicated resources for disability workers. 

Visual Audio

Click here to watch this video with Audio Description.

Anna’s Story – transcript of audio

Anna: Troy was our house manager.  We trusted him. But even when things didn’t feel right, who was going to ever believe me?
Support worker: Hi Anna, I’m on the house roster today and Troy has the night shift. You and your housemates seem to get on with him well.
Anna: Yes, he helps us a lot. If it wasn’t for Troy, I wouldn’t have found all this cool music.
Support worker: Sounds like he goes out of his way to help you.
Anna: I suppose he does.
Support worker: You seemed sad at your birthday party today Anna, are you OK?
Anna: I have something I want to tell you, but I don’t know how. 
Support worker: Maybe talk about it as if it was your friend? Remember how we do that sometimes?
Anna: Okay, well…someone my friend knows has been taking rude videos of her.
Support worker: I’d be worried if she was forced to do it.
Anna: She feels really scared about it.
Support worker: You know you can trust me, right? Is this happening to you Anna? 
Anna: I just don’t know what to do. Everyone likes him here.
Support worker: Likes who?
Anna: I’m scared to tell anyone. I don’t want to make it worse.
Support worker: I’m really sorry you’re going through this. Can you please tell me who it is?
Anna: Troy says I have to let him film me. Or he will send the videos to my family or post it on Facebook.
Support worker: What Troy has done is wrong. Is it OK for us to sort this out together?
Anna: Yes…I don’t want him doing this anymore.
Support worker: Alright. I’ll talk to my Team Leader about the next steps.
Anna: I’m worried. If I get Troy into trouble, I might get kicked out of here, away from my friends.
Support worker: That won’t happen. He has abused his position of trust.  My Team Leader has made a report to the National Disability Abuse and Neglect Hotline. The Police were also contacted. You have been so strong reporting Troy.
Anna: I didn’t know Troy was breaking the law.
Support worker: Yes, he was. You know, it’s OK to say no to someone even if they provide you care.
Anna: I didn’t want to cause a fuss.
Support worker: Not at all. We can also report his threats to share the photos he took of you to eSafety. Let’s check their website and find out more.
Anna: I feel happy knowing that someone listened to me.

Anna's story

Audio

Anna’s Story – transcript of audio

Anna: Troy was our house manager.  We trusted him. But even when things didn’t feel right, who was going to ever believe me?
Support worker: Hi Anna, I’m on the house roster today and Troy has the night shift. You and your housemates seem to get on with him well.
Anna: Yes, he helps us a lot. If it wasn’t for Troy, I wouldn’t have found all this cool music.
Support worker: Sounds like he goes out of his way to help you.
Anna: I suppose he does.
Support worker: You seemed sad at your birthday party today Anna, are you OK?
Anna: I have something I want to tell you, but I don’t know how. 
Support worker: Maybe talk about it as if it was your friend? Remember how we do that sometimes?
Anna: Okay, well…someone my friend knows has been taking rude videos of her.
Support worker: I’d be worried if she was forced to do it.
Anna: She feels really scared about it.
Support worker: You know you can trust me, right? Is this happening to you Anna? 
Anna: I just don’t know what to do. Everyone likes him here.
Support worker: Likes who?
Anna: I’m scared to tell anyone. I don’t want to make it worse.
Support worker: I’m really sorry you’re going through this. Can you please tell me who it is?
Anna: Troy says I have to let him film me. Or he will send the videos to my family or post it on Facebook.
Support worker: What Troy has done is wrong. Is it OK for us to sort this out together?
Anna: Yes…I don’t want him doing this anymore.
Support worker: Alright. I’ll talk to my Team Leader about the next steps.
Anna: I’m worried. If I get Troy into trouble, I might get kicked out of here, away from my friends.
Support worker: That won’t happen. He has abused his position of trust.  My Team Leader has made a report to the National Disability Abuse and Neglect Hotline. The Police were also contacted. You have been so strong reporting Troy.
Anna: I didn’t know Troy was breaking the law.
Support worker: Yes, he was. You know, it’s OK to say no to someone even if they provide you care.
Anna: I didn’t want to cause a fuss.
Support worker: Not at all. We can also report his threats to share the photos he took of you to eSafety. Let’s check their website and find out more.
Anna: I feel happy knowing that someone listened to me.
 

Anna's story - Audio Description

Stay safe

If you are feeling unsafe right now, call the police on Triple Zero (000) or contact 1800RESPECT (1800 737 732). Remember your safety is important. If an abusive person learns that you are seeking resources and information, their abusive behaviour may get worse. Learn more and connect with support.